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Considering all the options

Hillary Rodham Clinton (Wellesley College)
Hillary Rodham Clinton (Wellesley College) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
As people all over the country anxiously await the ruling of the Supreme Court on the constitutionality of the healthcare legislation promoted by the current administration, people are scrambling to implement the parts of it they can -- for fear of the legislation being struck down in part or as a whole.

There are great sounding arguments on both sides of the coin.  Conservatives say that the free market is the cure for the economy and the brotherhood of man in general.  Liberals or progressives tout the need to care for our fellow men and women and catch up to the rest of the civilized world in the process.

When I was younger, in the days of Bill and Hillary Clinton, I was a staunch proponent of national healthcare (a single payer system) and backed their plan 100%.  Oh heck, I was practically a socialist.  I have since moved to the right (so to speak) on a lot of issues as I've become older and [hopefully] wiser.  I have to admit, however, as much as I tell myself that I am more conservative than my liberal youth ever believed possible, that my heart still leans toward the single-payer camp.  There are a great many things to like about the current legislation -- especially in terms of not denying claims for pre-existing conditions and kids being able to stay on their parents plans longer.

When the healthcare legislation was crafted and [let's be honest] rammed through Congress, nobody really understood the scope of it (especially Nancy Pelosi). there are certainly things to dislike about it and I am not naive enough to believe that it won't cost us a lot, at least initially, to implement.  Many people of conservative mind have accused the president of ramming it through with his super-majority -- which of course he did.  how else could he have achieved it?  People talk about taking a bi-partisan approach to this but, considering that we can't even get a budget passed in three years, how would we ever deal with something as ideologically prone to debate as healthcare legislation?  What I have maintained about the bill all along is this:  it is a beginning.  Before we write it off in its entirety, I hope we can at least take the time to look at it, learn from it, and save the best of it.

How do you feel about this super-charged, all-important issue facing the American people right now?
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