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WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA - FEBRUARY 23: Comedian Bil...
WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA - FEBRUARY 23: Comedian Bill Maher and co-founder/editor-in-chief of The Huffington Post Arianna Huffington arrives at the Arianna Huffington & The Huffington Post presents Bill Maher and The Best of Huffpost Comedy event at The Roxy Theater on February 23, 2011 in West Hollywood, California. (Image credit: Getty Images via @daylife)
My wife claims that she dislikes Bill Maher, yet we seem to get stuck on that channel when she's surfing and spots his show "Real Time."  I, on the other hand, don't care for him and would rather not stop to watch his show when cruising through channels with the remote. The reason that I don't find his brand of humor particularly funny is that it comes at the expense of denigrating people, often times to an extreme.  Anybody can use a lot of profanity, make sexually provocative [and sometimes disgusting] comments and consider themselves funny in the process.  I guess that, if you're lucky, you'll get noticed and find yourself in a slot on HBO.

So, too lazy to get off the bed and go do something else, I suffered through a chunk of his show recently.  He had on a Republican congressman with a pronounced southern drawl who rolled over and took it while Bill ranted about the superstitious, fanatical GOP and, of course, Representative Akin -- whose views he asserted are those of many of his Republican colleagues.  The southern gentleman had plenty of opportunities in which he could have pointed out the fallacy of Maher's statements, but chose instead to sit there with a stupid grin on his face and take it in.

In my opinion, Maher may consider himself a comedian, but he centers his entire show around political issues and uses it as a platform from which to launch his agenda on the viewership.  I see no room for civility in an act like his.  The problem I do see is that his 'act' is not an act and produces consequences with the twisted, distorted material he spews that is taken away and enhanced -so it can be spoon-fed to the 'ignorant masses.' He's the type of guy who scoffs at the debt as though it were some contrived notion created solely for the purpose of the Republican agenda.  He clearly considers himself an intellectual who is kind enough to share his enlightened thoughts with us.  I think that he would be better suited for a network like MSNBC than HBO.  Either way, he gets paid well for his particular brand of comedy and is not likely to change any time soon.  People seem to love his "shock jock" style of entertainment.  Obviously, I do not.  I have been on the planet long enough and have dealt with his type to such an extent that I don't need to spend my leisure time tuning in to more of the same.

I don't mind listening to other's points of view (unless they are extremely stupid), but there comes a time when one is simply being subjected to a rant or monologue designed solely to boost the ranter's own self-perceived status to something that could not be achieved if they allowed any intellectual challenge to their viewpoint.  Chris Matthews of the faltering MSNBC network [in my opinion] tried the same thing yesterday with the chairman of the GOP -and it was sickeningly obvious what he was up to.  When all else fails and you can't document your views with fact, pull out the race card and pay it for all it's worth. If you monopolize the 'conversation' and talk loud enough and long enough, then what you say must be true, right?

George W. Bush
I'm not a Republican -and have no great love for the party, any more so than I do the party I belonged to for most of my life - the Democrats.  I tend to lean more libertarian as I age than anything else.  Big government doesn't work.  That's what I figured out. Both the major parties seem to think that it does.  The GOP may pretend that they promote small government, but Nixon, Ford and both George H.W. and George W. Bush acted in manners that disproved that.  I believe that eight years of George W. did a lot of damage to the credibility of the GOP as a 'conservative' party.  I also believe that we have had worse presidents than him.

Although not a Republican, I find their views [of the two parties] closest to my own in fiscal terms.  If speaking of morality... well, let's not.  I leave that to one's own conscience and religious beliefs, if any.  Perhaps, as some like-minded people assert, the thing to do is join the GOP and, once infiltrated in sufficient numbers, begin to make changes and return to a constitutionally-mandated form of government.

Mitt Romney, former governor of Massachusetts,...
Mitt Romney may not be my first choice in candidates, but I have to believe that a Romney administration is better than another 4 years of "hope and change.'"  I don't think we can take any more change like that and we're certainly running out of hope.

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