[REPOST] Signed, Sealed & Delivered!


This was originally posted in another blog I have. I thought it might bear repeating! 

One of the areas that I am in whole agreement with my Baptist brothers and sisters (as well as many others) is the idea of Eternal Security. I believe that once you are truly saved [not just some sort of emotional experience of the moment that may or may not be genuine], the guarantee of salvation is forever. It was taken care of a long time ago at the cross and you have chosen to accept God's gift of GRACE. It's not just enough that I say I believe it because I want it to be so; there is strong scriptural support for it as doctrine.

For the sake of the length of this post, I would like to focus on a few verses of Scripture that support this idea. Although there are many more, I will quote only a few for brevity:

And I give unto them eternal life; and they shall never perish, neither shall any man pluck them out of my hand. My Father, which gave them me, is greater than all; and no man is able to pluck them out of my Father's hand. -John 10:28-29

Just those two verses above are sufficient enough for me to believe this is an eternal state we enter into when we accept Jesus as our Savior. But... let's look at some more:

In Him, you also, when you heard the word of truth, the good news of your salvation, and [as a result] believed in Him, were stamped with the seal of the promised Holy Spirit [the One promised by Christ] as owned and protected [by God]. -Ephesians 1:13 (AMP)

Most translations use the word "sealed" in the verse above. One that does not is the New Living Translation, a favorite dynamic version that I feel falls short in translating that verse and also Ephesians 4:30, where it also does not use the word "sealed." The NLT, in Ephesians 4:30, replaces sealed with "guaranteeing that you will be saved..." and adds a footnote Or has put his seal on you. While I think it is saying essentially the same thing as other translations do, I really like the use of the word "sealed" as it truly denotes a permanence to the action. Let's look at one of the ways dictionary.com defines the verb sealto decide irrevocably: to seal someone's fate.


And grieve not the holy Spirit of God, whereby ye are sealed unto the day of redemption. -Ephesians 4:30

To suggest that someone can be at one time saved and later lose their salvation through some action they commit [or something that they don't do] is nothing short of legalism and attempts to diminish the finished work of Christ on the cross. Such teaching does not seem to me to be biblical and should be avoided. While I would not separate from my brothers and sisters in the faith who think otherwise, I do feel strongly that once you are saved by grace through faith, the blood of Jesus is sufficient to keep you in His loving grasp forever.

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